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“Worm counts are a key element of proactive parasite control and Wormcount.com provides an excellent service.  Their very detailed laboratory reports are an invaluable diagnostic tool for my holistic veterinary practice.”

Dr Richard Allport BVet Med. Vet MFHom MRCVS

Worm Count for Companion Animals

Until Wormcount.com was created, routine worm counts for companion animals were expensive and time consuming, as they were carried out almost exclusively by a Vet.  You took your pet to the Vet, and then had to return with a faecal sample, which was then sent off to the lab.  Several days passed and you were presented with the results, and a big bill.  Worming advice was given and generally chemical worming products were also sold to you.

There is nothing wrong with this process, except that it is taking up a Vet’s very valuable diagnostic surgery time on a routine process.  Now Wormcount.com offers a personal, fast, reliable, cost-effective alternative.  This will save a visit to the Vet for you, and maximise the Vet’s time for sick animals. But when you do need to visit the vet, taking a parasite screen report with you saves a lot of time and can make diagnosis much quicker for your vet and your pet.

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doveWormcount.com Veterinary Laboratory

With Wormcount.com you now have direct access to a fast, professional veterinary laboratory without the need for a referral from your Vet.  Wormcount.com will investigate internal parasites in all companion animals, including budgerigars, cats, dogs, pigeons, parakeets and rabbits.  We will also test guinea pigs, hamsters, rats and mice.  If you can not find information on your pet on these pages, please contact our lab and we will be very happy to discuss parasite issues with you.

 

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toxocara_canis_in_dog_faecesWormcount.com for Cats and Dogs

If your cat or dog goes out hunting, or if you walk him in the countryside or park, he can pick up internal and external parasites which may make him seriously ill. Many of these parasites can also be passed on to you or your family, causing serious health problems.  Children playing with dogs in the garden are especially in danger of picking up soil contaminated with worm eggs on their hands.  This is an easy path for the Toxocara parasites to enter their bodies.  Toxocara worms can cause blindness in humans.

We screen for many parasites which affect your pet.  Click here  to learn more about some of the most common parasites we find when screening your animals, and how they are affected by them.

 

lungworm

Lungworm

For dogs and cats the potentially fatal Lungworm is on the increase.  This causes coughs, debility, weight loss and increased bleeding from wounds. It is difficult to cure once contracted. Learn more here.

 

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Chemical or Natural Wormers?

Increasing numbers of pet owners are turning away from chemical wormers, preferring to use herbal products.  However, is the herbal remedy you use really suited to your particular animal?

Perhaps you chose not to worm at all.   But can you be absolutely sure that your animal has not picked up a parasite from another animal whilst having a friendly sniff?  Does he go out for walks?  Could he have eaten something that is full of worms?

Whether you regularly worm using chemical or natural wormers, or you have chosen not to worm at all, the only way to have peace of mind is to be sure that your regime is working. A worm count will check the parasite burden in your animal. It must be remembered though, that a worm count, like an MOT for your car, is only a snapshot of what is going on inside your animal at that moment.  You need to check regularly to ensure the well-being of your pet.

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Wormcounting under the microscope

So what is a worm count?

  • A Faecal Egg Count or FEC counts the number of worm eggs in your pet’s faeces (poo).
  • The results are presented as ‘eggs per gram’ (epg) of faeces. There is an easy to understand key on your Wormcount.com result sheet.
  • The number of eggs is an indication of the number of adult worms in the gut of your dog or cat.
  • Lungworm and heartworm screens are different as they look for live larvae in the faeces.

Why should I use a worm count?

  • It will help you to decide whether you need to worm
  • It can tell you if your worming regime is working
  • It can give you information about the amount of contamination going into your environment.

 

Remember – animals do not have to ‘look wormy’ to ‘be wormy’. If they do, it is often too late!

healty_dog_with_wormsWhen this picture was taken of this healthy looking dog, he had a high worm count of 200 epg of Dipylidium caninum (tapeworm) and also screened positive for Lungworm. We advised on treatment for him, and we are delighted report that “Harvey” made a full recovery thanks to Wormcount.com working closely with the owner and the Vet.

How often should I use a worm count?

Some worms can appear as mature, egg-laying adults within as few as 30 days of being picked up as eggs or larvae by your animal.  It is therefore important to have your pet worm counted regularly, to ensure nothing is missed.  We recommend a regime of two-monthly screening for high-risk animals. This includes dogs that are let off the lead or have access to slugs, snails or canine faeces, cats that go hunting, and any animals that live in areas where lungworm is more prevalent.   Two to four-monthly screens should be sufficient for all other animals provided they are worm free.

Many of the parasites which infest your dog or cat can be passed on to you or your children – often with catastrophic effect.  It is therefore equally important for your family to know that your pet is worm-free.  A worm count from Wormcount.com will do this for you. Order your worm count kit here.